Black Austin

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Hoover's Cooking

Home cooked Southern classics

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This Austin icon has been serving up comfort food on Manor Road since 1998. Hoover's menu encompases the many cultures that make up the South, from Tex-Mex to Cajun and barbecue to soul food. So if you find yourself craving comfort food and Southern hospitality, this is the spot.

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(512) 479-5006

2002 Manor Rd, Austin, TX

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Aaron Bender

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Willie's Bar-B-Que

Neighborhood joint for barbecue and boudin

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This informal family run spot has been serving barbecue classics like sausage and brisket in the same location since the 80's. In addition to those classic meats that you'll find in barbecue joints all over the city, their menu also includes mutton and a crowd pleasing boudin. While you have to wait in long lines at many of the hip, newer places in town, this no frills spot serves you your food within minutes of arrival.

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(512) 926-9340

4505 E Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Austin, TX

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Dawson Westenskow

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Altatudes

High-end women's boutique

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This chic and luxurious boutique sources its clothes and accessories from as close by as the other side of town to as far away as the other side of the ocean. They stock a limited number of each piece and are often the only Austin carrier of the designers they stock, so you are sure to get some unique pieces.

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(512) 761-4292

1717 E 12th St, Austin, TX

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Altatudes

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Tony’s Jamaican Food

Welcoming spot for flavorful Jamaican fare

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Tony's has arguably the best jerk chicken, ox tails, and other jamaican classics in the city and unlike most food trucks, the atmosphere here only adds to the to the experience. When you show up to the truck's window, you are warmly welcomed by Tony and his team. Once your food is ready, grab a seat on their patio to enjoy your food with the background soundtrack of some reggae music.

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(512) 945-5090

1200 E 11th St, Austin, TX

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Michelle C.

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Six Square

The heart of Austin's Black heritage

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In the 1920’s the African American population in Austin was thriving in East Austin, as well as in other parts of the city, clustered around churches, Black-owned businesses, and segregated schools. Noticing this, the city council decided to use their 1928 City Plan to solve the “segregation problem.” They had to get creative because a 1917 Supreme Court decision made it unconstitutional to use zoning laws to segregate neighborhoods. Their work around was to cut off city services to all areas of the city that housed Black residents except East Austin, forcing them to relocate to what the city designated the “Negro district.” In 1962, the racial divide was physically cemented when I-35 was constructed over East Avenue to separate the Black and Latino population from the rest of the city. Six Square is the cultural district that flourished as a result and in spite of that forced segregation. While gentrification has claimed many of the cultural landmarks in the neighborhood, some highlights still remain including the George Washington Carver Museum which has a few small exhibits and a genealogy center, the Dedrick-Hamilton House which is a historic home that was built and owned by one of the country's first freed slaves, and Downs Field which was the home of the Austin Black Senators, the first Negro League Baseball team in the city.

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(512) 974-4926

1165 Angelina St, Austin, TX

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Thomas Bentley

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We Rise Mural

A mural the neighborhood fought for

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In 2014, local artist Chris Rogers (@chrisrogersart) painted a mural here as an homage to the rich history of East Austin's historically African-American community. The neighborhood has been faced with rapid gentrification in recent years, but the artist and local residents were nevertheless surprised and upset when a new shop and gallery moved into the building in 2017 and painted the wall containing his mural white. Neighborhood leaders brought the community together to address the loss of this cultural monument, and they prevailed. By the end of the year, Rogers returned to the wall with his paint to complete the mural you see here. Click the info button below for a great Austin Monthly article about the controversy

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1900 E 12th St, Austin, TX

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christopher Anderson

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