Black Charleston

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Hannibal's Kitchen

Bare bones spot for Gullah staples

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While this neighborhood spot has been serving it's soul food for year, it has maintained the quality that keeps locals and now visitors raving. You have to try the crab rice while you are here, and if you think you can manage, pair it with other Gullah staples like okra soup or lima beans.

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(843) 722-2256

16 Blake St, Charleston, SC

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Jeffrey Jordan

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Rodney Scott's BBQ

Whole hog barbecue in a hip space

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After gaining international attention for his whole hog barbecue in Hemingway, South Carolina, the James Beard award winner opened this spot in town. Stop in for some pulled pork, ribs, and as many sides as you can muster.

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(843) 990-9535

1011 King St, Charleston, SC

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Kyle Barron

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Denmark Vesey House

Abolitionist who was executed for an alleged revolt

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Born into slavery, Denmark Vesey bought his freedom with money he won in a lottery when he was 32. About 20 years later, Vesey left his church due to the poor treatment of its Black members and became a founding member of what Mother Emanuel AME. City officials often shut down his new church and routinely harassed its members. His position made him a leader in the community and garnered him a large following of both the enslaved and free people who were fed up with the harassment. So in 1822, Vesey along with a number of enslaved workers allegedly began to plan a slave revolt. They were said to have recruited thousands of people from miles around to take part in the insurrection that would have been the largest of its kind in US history, however before it could take place the plot was leaked. A militia rounded up all suspected leaders and conducted a fast, secret trial where many of the witnesses testified under threat of torture or death. Vesey along with 34 others were executed. While little is known for sure about the supposed uprising or if it even existed in the first place, what is sure is that Denmark Vesey was a leader in the community, an abolitionist, and a hero of the Civil Rights movement. This house that is a National Historic Landmark was most likely not his home, but he did live on this street for many years.

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56 Bull St, Charleston, SC

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Hunter Clark

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A Bench by the Road

A place to remember the lives of enslaved Africans

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An estimated 40% of the Africans transported to North America via the Middle Passage passed through Sullivan’s Island. It is estimated that nearly half of all African Americans today have ancestors who went through quarantine here. In an interview in 1989, author and Nobel laureate Toni Morrison said, "There is no place you or I can go, to think about or not think about, to summon the presences of, or recollect the absences of slaves . . . There is no suitable memorial, or plaque, or wreath, or wall, or park, or skyscraper lobby. There's no 300-foot tower, there's no small bench by the road." And there wasn't until the Toni Morrison Society placed this bench here in 2008. This bench overlooking the water is behind the Fort Moultrie Visitor Center.

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1214 Middle St, Sullivan's Island, SC

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Hunter Clark

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Gallery Chuma

Art of the Gullah people

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Situated in the indoor section of the City Market, this wonderful gallery features paintings that depict the Gullah people. While the majority of the paintings and prints available are colorful works by South Carolina treasure Jonathan Green, there are also displays by emerging artists in the space. This cultural gem makes it easy to find what you are looking for with everything from inexpensive prints to Green's original paintings.

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(843) 722-1702

188 Meeting Street, #N1, Charleston, SC

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Gallery Chuma Inc

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Cabbage Row

Inspiration for Catfish Row in Porgy and Bess

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In 1925, local writer DuBose Heyward wrote the novel Porgy, which George Gershwin later adapted into the opera Porgy and Bess. In addition to being one of his most famous operas, one that is still performed around the world today, the opera produced the hit song Summertime. The characters of Porgy and Bess were based off of real life Charlestonians Samuel Smalls and Maggie Barnes. Similarly, a real place in Charleston known as Cabbage Row was the inspiration for Catfish Row. You can see the few buildings that are still left from Cabbage Row at 89 and 91 Church Street.

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89 Church Street, Charleston, SC

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Hunter Clark

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