Ghosts

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LaLaurie Mansion

Most haunted house in the city

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In 1831 the twice widowed Delphine Macarty moved into this house with her husband Dr. Leonard Louis Nicolas LaLaurie. Shortly after they moved in rumors started to fly about what a cruel mistress she was to her enslaved workers, especially after a neighbor saw one fall from the roof to her death. The council held an inquiry and freed all of the enslaved people she owned, only for her to buy them all back one by one. In early 1834 Madame and Dr. LaLaurie's unhappy marriage ended with the doctor moving out. A few months later, a fire broke out in the home that was intentionally started by an enslaved woman who was chained to the stove as punishment. Upon entering the burning building, neighbors found seven starved and tortured workers. When the people of New Orleans found out about this they were outraged, especially at the fact that the Sheriff didn't arrest her. So they took matters into their own hands and formed a mob to make the Madame pay for what she had done. Madame LaLaurie and her family barely made it out of the city, at which point she fled to Paris, never to return. The story of the sadistic treatment of the enslaved people immediately made national headlines, with Madame LaLaurie dubbed a monster. In more modern times, the Madame's story was reintroduced to the public as part of the plot of American Horror Story: Coven, that filmed some scenes in and around the building. The poor souls of the enslaved people who didn't survive Madame LaLaurie are said to still haunt the building today.

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1140 Royal St, New Orleans, LA

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Ghost City Tours

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Muriel's Jackson Square

Seance room and a table set for the dead

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While most of Muriel's functions like any other restaurant, the second floor Seance Lounge is more offbeat than your typical dining establishment. In the Inner Seance, where most of the sightings of former owner Pierre Antoine Lepardi Jourdan happen, the restaurant staff set a table with bread and wine every day for their resident ghost. Jourdan used the building as his private residence starting in the late 1700's, which became his pride and joy as well as one of the finest residences in the city. In 1814, in the midst of a heated poker game, Jourdan decided to wager his house, which was no longer his by the end of the game. Unable to handle the loss of his beloved home, Jourdan killed himself not far from where his table is set each night. While he is the restaurant's most active ghost, he is far from its only resident. In addition to reports of disembodied female voices, there is pesky ghost in the Courtyard Bar who has been known to shatter glasses against the brick wall.

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(504) 568-1885

801 Chartres St, New Orleans, LA

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Muriel's Jackson Square

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Carousel Bar

Haunted by a dozen entities

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The gorgeous merry-go-round bar has been making a rotation every fifteen minutes for over 65 years in the lobby of Hotel Monteleone, one of the most haunted hotels in the city. Guests have reported sightings of William “Red” Wildemere, a guest who died in the hotel, as well as Maurice Begere, a toddler who died in his room in the late 1800's. The Bergers, who frequently stayed at the hotel, came to town to attend the opera. Although they brought their young son on the trip, he was not old enough to go with them to the opera, so they left Maurice in the room with a nanny. After the parents had left for the night, the boy developed a fever and died before they returned. The grief stricken parents who could not handle the loss of their only child frequently returned to the hotel over the next few years in hopes that his spirit would visit them, which eventually he did. A pajama-clad Maurice came to his mother on what is called the 14th floor, but is actually the 13th level of the building, and said “Mommy, don’t cry. I'm fine.” to give his grief stricken mother some closure. To this day, guests staying on the 14th floor often report sightings of a happy toddler dressed in old fashioned pajamas. When the International Society of Paranormal Research visited the hotel in 2003, they made contact with over a dozen beings, citing the paranormal activity on that floor as off the charts.

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(504) 523-3341

214 Royal St, New Orleans, LA

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Carousel Bar

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Pharmacy Museum

The sadistic former occupant comes back after hours

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This historic French Quarter building was home to an 1823 apothecary that was later turned into a museum with exhibits on everything from early medicines and superstitious cures to the history of pharmacy and healthcare. While some of the artifacts in the museum look a little spooky, they have nothing on the former owner of the space. Joseph Dupas, who was a doctor, was rumored to have performed horrific experiments on pregnant slaves. His ghost, seen in a brown suit and matching hat, moves about the space throwing things after hours and often sets off the security alarm. Pregnant women who visit the building are more often able to feel his presence than others due to his alleged history. There is a guided tour at 1:00, Tuesdays through Fridays.

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(504) 565-8027

514 Chartres St, New Orleans, LA

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uzma pathan

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Jonathan Weiss Tours

Ghost, vampire and dark history tours

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There are many options for ghost and vampire tours in the city, but Jonathan is the one you want. He is a great storyteller who even dresses the part.

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(504) 681-9830

Pirates Alley

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Jonathan Weiss Tours

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Old Absinthe House

Jean Lafitte is still partying to this day

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The absinth frappe was invented in this bar that played host to a very important meeting between pirate Jean Lafitte and future president Andrew Jackson. Legend has it that Jackson came to town to prepare for upcoming battles of the War of 1812. The general had a fleet of ships but no one skilled enough to handle them, whereas Lafitte had men but no ships because he had just lost many of them in a standoff with the US Navy. Once Jackson agreed to pardon Lafitte and all of his men as well as free his brother from jail, they agreed to help Jackson win the Battle of New Orleans, effectively ending the War of 1812. Even though that meeting happened a couple hundred years ago, Andrew Jackson is said to still haunt this place. Jean Lafitte is also said to occasionally party at this bar, to which much of the unexplained laughter and other superfluous noise is attributed too. Not one to ever let the men have all of the fun, Voodoo priestess Marie Laveau is often spotted at the bar as well. While these famous ghosts are often spotted, some unidentified spirits are regulars as well, including a child running around the third floor and a woman in a long white dress. So if you feel a sudden drop in temperature and think that there might be a ghost around, there are many possibilities as to who just joined you for a drink.

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(504) 523-3181

240 Bourbon St, New Orleans, LA

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Sean Maday

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