Ghosts

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Haunted Jail Walking Tour

The Old City Jail is now haunted

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This building served as the city jail from 1803 to 1939, so it is no surprise that it picked up a few spirits along the way. And while most of the people jailed here were petty criminals, a few were hanged in the yard for their offences. When the Old City Jail underwent renovations in 2000, construction workers spent a lot of time in the building, enough to encounter some less than moretal beings. After the building had been sealed for months, they came back to human footprints clearly imprinted in the dust on the floor. Additionally, one night when they were working late, they encountered the spirit of a former guard patrolling the third floor with a rifle. When the guard saw the workers, he charged at them, before vanishing into thin air. To see the inside, sign up for the Haunted Jail Walking Tour with Bulldog tours, linked below.

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Jeff

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White Point Garden

Pirates' spirits roam the park

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Charleston was overrun with pirates in its early years, which culminated in Blackbeard and Stede Bonnet blockading the port for six days in 1718. The governor sent Colonel William Rhett after the pirates to make them pay for what they did. He caught up to and captured Bonnet and his crew and brought them back to the city. They were chained up in the Provost Dungeon until all they were all convicted and hanged in White Point Garden. Over a period of five weeks, forty-nine pirates were hanged, and it is said that a number of them still haunt the garden. Visitors report seeing faces peering out from trees, or even hanging from them. And if you are visiting at night, you might hear the echoing screams of the pirates who never left.

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Matthew Fortner

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Poogan's Porch

Classic Southern food and a former resident who never left

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This iconic Charleston eatery in a converted Victorian home is the go to place for Southern dishes and Lowcountry ghosts. In addition to the friendly ghost of Poogan, the dog who gave his name to the restaurant, another former resident haunts patrons. Zoe St. Amand used to live in this house with her sister, Elizabeth, and when Elizabeth died, Zoey fell into a depression. A short time later, she had a breakdown and was taken to the hospital where she lived out the rest of her days. It is believed that Zoey came back to her former home in order to look for her sister. She is frequently seen by guests as well as staff members floating through the restaurant or popping up behind women in the restroom mirror. There have even been a few occasions when people staying at the hotel across the street have seen her in the window after hours and believe that she is a dinner guest who has accidentally been locked inside, so they call the police to alert them of the situation. This is the perfect place to sample local favorites like She-Crab Soup, Pimento Cheese Fritters, and as many biscuits as you can eat. They serve a very popular brunch seven days a week as well as an equally as delicious dinner. Reservations are highly recommended.

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(843) 577-2337

72 Queen St, Charleston, SC

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Poogan's Porch

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Dock Street Theatre

Spirit of famous actor Junius Brutus Booth remains

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Dock Street Theater has been hosting theatrical performances since 1736, and still does to this day. Guests have seen ghosts all over the theater, from up in the rafters to down on stage. It makes sense that the ghosts here are ghosts of actors, but one actor in particular loves to haunt the theater. Famous actor Junius Brutus Booth, the father of John Wilkes Booth who is the man that shot Abraham Lincoln, is said to appear often but no one can figure out why. While he did perform at the hotel that used to stand here with his troupe, he died all the way in Louisville and he didn't spend a great deal of time in the city. So who knows, it may be another actor that looks like him. There is a second ghost who is seen more frequently than Booth. It is a prostitute named Nettie who is said to have been struck dead by lightning on the second floor balcony of this former hotel. In addition to housing these ghosts, the theater does put on a very good production in their beautiful space. Check their website to see what is playing when you are in town.

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Dock Street Theatre

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Old Exchange & Dungeon

Old Dungeon filled with ghosts

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While the top two floors of this historic building are filled with museum exhibits, the bottom houses the ghosts of the people who were chained down there Charleston was overrun with pirates in its early years, which culminated in Blackbeard and Stede Bonnet blockading the port for six days in 1718. The governor sent Colonel William Rhett after the pirates to make them pay for what they did. He caught up to and captured Bonnet and his crew and brought them back to the Provost Dungeon, where they were chained up until their execution. Additionally, when the British had control of the city, this is where they kept the colonists who betrayed the monarchy. So when you hear moaning or screaming emanating from the basement or see the chains that are hanging from the dungeon walls start to move without anyone touching them, it could be either a pirate or colonist who spent time here before their death. Entrance to the museum includes a 25 minute guided tour of the dungeon.

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(843) 727-2165

122 E Bay St, Charleston, SC

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Russell Dodge

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Blind Tiger Pub

Laid back pub with incredible patio and strange occurances

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Locals flock to this Charleston institution with one of the best patios in the city when the weather is nice enough to sit outside. There are fire pits for when it is a bit cooler, shady trees for when the sun is out, and a bar out back so that you never have to leave. And there are a few patrons who never do leave. There is a rude female ghost, often seen in a black dress, who is said to pull the hair of and pick fights with guests. No one knows who she is, but some think she may have been a regular at a speakeasy that was here during prohibition. This area had a number of speakeasies at the time and the bar's name is an ode to those institutions being known as Blind Tigers.

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(843) 872-6700

36-38 Broad St, Charleston, SC

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Tim Enright

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